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Welcome to the New Canaan Pollinator Pathway

HELP US MAKE THE CAM HUTCHINS MEMORIAL POLLINATOR GARDEN A REALITY!

A pollinator garden in memory of Cam Hutchins is being planned for Bristow Park and Bird Sanctuary.

Hear Robin Bates-Mason talk about the project 

https://newcanaanite.libsyn.com/0684-radi0-the-cam-hutchins-pollinator-garden-july-27-2023

All money raised will be matched by Sustainable CT!

Help us reach our goal by clicking the button below:

About Us!

In April 2019, town organizations partnered to initiate the Pollinator-Pathway in New Canaan.  These organizations have pollinator-friendly pieces of property that laid the initial framework for the pathway in town.

 

In June 2019, New Canaan officially launched the movement with a kickoff event at the New Canaan Library with presentations by Mary Ellen LeMay and Louise Washer.

 

Our goal is to continue the corridors of pollinator-friendly properties with private and public land.  Residents are encouraged to "bee" on the pathway and sign up their own pollinator-friendly property by clicking the purple button below.

 

Need more information on how to make your property pollinator-friendly?  Visit the Pollinator-Pathway home page here:  www.pollinator-pathway.org.  You'll find links to great resources on alternatives to pesticides, native plant lists, and more!

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find us on Instagram ->

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By Joining the New Canaan Pollinator Pathway you are agree to:

(1) Reduce lawn size, provide predominantly native and pollinator-supporting plants and assure a sequence of blooms from early spring through fall (see www.pollinator-pathway.org for helpful lists);


(2) Protect and enrich soil by using organic yard-care practices and avoid using pesticides and herbicides. When pesticides and/or herbicides are deemed absolutely necessary, consider hiring an Integrated Pest Management professional with knowledge of how to apply them with the least negative impact on the environment.

(3) Follow best practices for garden clean up: clean up in the spring, allow plant heads to remain through winter when possible, to provide food for wildlife, keep plant stalks standing and leave snags of dead wood for native bees to nest, leave the leaves on flower beds through fall and winter to provide habitat, soil nourishment and protection for overwintering pollinators; and

(4) Have a water feature, e.g., bird bath, fountain or natural water source.

 

Bee
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